Questions/Comments   I'm not sure Dave Cockrum has much relevance beyond the Sci-Fi, Disco-Comics Era (1974-1979), but I'm into him.

brianmichaelbendis:

The Wedding of Bouncing Boy and Duo Damsel by Dave Cockrum

brianmichaelbendis:

The Wedding of Bouncing Boy and Duo Damsel by Dave Cockrum

(Source: cantstopthinkingcomics)

— 3 weeks ago with 87 notes
marvel1980s:

1990 - Uncanny X-men Tor paperback

dave cockrum/dan green repurposed cover originally from X-MEN no. 107

marvel1980s:

1990 - Uncanny X-men Tor paperback

dave cockrum/dan green repurposed cover originally from X-MEN no. 107

(via themarvelageofcomics)

— 4 weeks ago with 503 notes
thebristolboard:

Original cover art by Dave Cockrum from The X-Men #102, published by Marvel, December 1976.

thebristolboard:

Original cover art by Dave Cockrum from The X-Men #102, published by Marvel, December 1976.

— 4 weeks ago with 155 notes

marvel1980s:

1979 - Anatomy of a Cover - Spider-Woman #13
By Dave Cockrum and Bob McLeod

(via pulpoprd)

— 4 weeks ago with 162 notes
I just stumbled upon this from Tom Spurgeon’s excellent Dave Cockrum obituary.
“It’s easy to underestimate Cockrum’s penciled art in the book itself. Cockrum’s penciled interiors on those first few issues of the “new” X-Men were dark and appealingly dramatic; in keeping with the book’s more serious themes, the evocation of superpowers in the stories was often depicted as dirty and painful, and his characters were for the most part weathered adults instead of smooth-faced children — in a time near the end of the Cold War when that distinction mattered. Cockrum gave those first few issues of X-Men a sumptuous, late-’70s cinema style that separated the book from the rest of Marvel’s line, and superhero comics in general. Reading those X-Men comics felt like sneaking into a movie starring Sean Connery or Sigourney Weaver, something for adults because it featured people that looked like adults. Uncanny X-Men really felt new and different, almost right away, and Cockrum’s art was a tremendous part of that.”
Read the whole thing HERE

I just stumbled upon this from Tom Spurgeon’s excellent Dave Cockrum obituary.

It’s easy to underestimate Cockrum’s penciled art in the book itself. Cockrum’s penciled interiors on those first few issues of the “new” X-Men were dark and appealingly dramatic; in keeping with the book’s more serious themes, the evocation of superpowers in the stories was often depicted as dirty and painful, and his characters were for the most part weathered adults instead of smooth-faced children — in a time near the end of the Cold War when that distinction mattered. Cockrum gave those first few issues of X-Men a sumptuous, late-’70s cinema style that separated the book from the rest of Marvel’s line, and superhero comics in general. Reading those X-Men comics felt like sneaking into a movie starring Sean Connery or Sigourney Weaver, something for adults because it featured people that looked like adults. Uncanny X-Men really felt new and different, almost right away, and Cockrum’s art was a tremendous part of that.”

Read the whole thing HERE

— 1 month ago with 18 notes
johnbyrnedraws:

Iron Fist #15, page 11 by John Byrne & Dave Cockrum & Dan Green. 1977.
Dave Cockrum at the direction of Jim Shooter, redrew the faces of the X-Men in this issue of Iron Fist. Specific to this page, he also drew the “Fang” costume as John Byrne originally drew Wolverne’s regular costume.
To quote JB:

"I drew Wolverine in his usual duds, and editorial had them redrawn as the Fang outfit. Lot of redrawing on that issue. Virtually none of the X-faces are mine. Since it was my "audition" for UNCANNY, it seemed very odd to allow Dave [Cockrum] such liberties. At the time, I asked if he was going to redraw all the faces in the regular title once I came aboard."


haha… john byrne getting miffed over dave cockrum redrawing his X-MEN faces and WOLVERINE’s costume in IRON FIST no. 15

johnbyrnedraws:

Iron Fist #15, page 11 by John Byrne & Dave Cockrum & Dan Green. 1977.

Dave Cockrum at the direction of Jim Shooter, redrew the faces of the X-Men in this issue of Iron Fist. Specific to this page, he also drew the “Fang” costume as John Byrne originally drew Wolverne’s regular costume.

To quote JB:

"I drew Wolverine in his usual duds, and editorial had them redrawn as the Fang outfit. Lot of redrawing on that issue. Virtually none of the X-faces are mine. Since it was my "audition" for UNCANNY, it seemed very odd to allow Dave [Cockrum] such liberties. At the time, I asked if he was going to redraw all the faces in the regular title once I came aboard."

haha… john byrne getting miffed over dave cockrum redrawing his X-MEN faces and WOLVERINE’s costume in IRON FIST no. 15

(via themarvelageofcomics)

— 1 month ago with 171 notes
transmissionsgeekroom:

Yeeeeahhhh, that’s a little ‘fact’ that the writers will gladly gloss over real soon.
X-Men #95, October 1975 Dave Cockrum and Chris Claremont

but he could fall nearly to the ground and then teleport back to the higher elevation, right? Couldn’t he just do that all day?

transmissionsgeekroom:

Yeeeeahhhh, that’s a little ‘fact’ that the writers will gladly gloss over real soon.

X-Men #95, October 1975
Dave Cockrum and Chris Claremont

but he could fall nearly to the ground and then teleport back to the higher elevation, right? Couldn’t he just do that all day?

— 1 month ago with 38 notes
intrapanel:

X-MEN #145
1981, Marvel Comics

Chris Claremont writer, Dave Cockrum and Joe Rubenstein artists, Joe Rosen letters, Glynis Wein colors

intrapanel:

X-MEN #145

1981, Marvel Comics

Chris Claremont writer, Dave Cockrum and Joe Rubenstein artists, Joe Rosen letters, Glynis Wein colors

— 1 month ago with 9 notes
transmissionsgeekroom:

Chris and Dave make a cameo!
X-Men #105, June 1977 Dave Cockrum and Chris Claremont

transmissionsgeekroom:

Chris and Dave make a cameo!

X-Men #105, June 1977
Dave Cockrum and Chris Claremont

— 1 month ago with 23 notes